24 agosto 2015

Solo women traveling in Iran -- what men won't tell you


Before: at the gate of the airport in Istanbul, waiting to board the plane that will take us to Tehran, women surrounding us are dressed in tight clothes that show their gym shaped bodies and décolletés, no veil. After: the plane touches Tehran's soil, and what you see is a synchronized movement of women putting their veil over their heads, changed into large shirts that cover arms and butts. The two different lives will be the refrain of your trip: welcome to Iran. 
"Welcome to Iran" is what we heard the most: people literally stop you in the middle of the street curious to know where you're from, and end with this refrain. Once, a bread seller who was trying to sell us bread ten times its price, suddenly stopped the bargaining and asked us: "Where are you from?". And then: "Welcome to Iran". Still we haven't figured out if he was intentionally ironic.
But that is actually what you feel as soon as you jump in the first taxi from the airport: welcomed. From the people, on top of everything else. And from the beauty of the mosques and the Shahs' palaces that you'll visit during your trip. 
Unfortunately, though, we early discovered that not everyone's equally welcomed: women. We both have travelled a lot, mostly backpacking, and one of us has also been in various Middle Eastern countries. But what we had to experience in Iran has shocked the both of us and deeply influenced the mood of our holiday. This is why we decided to share our experience of two women traveling in Iran by themselves - and Lonely Planet is very deficient on this point, plus on the web you won't find much - so that you know what could happen to you and consciously decide to go or not. Or better: how to avoid very negative experiences. 

Touching your butts
Bazars are very crowded, so it's heaven for butt touching lovers. The man starts walking behind you, and suddenly grasps your butt and quickly leaves in the middle of the crowd. 
Men following you
At a bazar in Tehran a man started following us. After twenty minutes, we decided to leave and stepped into the metro station. He followed us even there and became explicit about wanting to go to bed with one of us. At first we said no several times, then tried to ignore him. None of them worked. We arrived at the turnstiles, but those didn't stop him either: he jumped over and was ready to follow us onto the train. At that point the only way to block him was calling security, and that's what we did.
Men showing you their penus
We were in the biggest mosque of Iran, in Esfahan. A guy working there said hi to us and asked where we were from. Stop. Having finished visiting the mosque, we decided to sit at the entrance to eat some fruit. The same guy passed in front of us, then came back and while passing in front of us  - et voilà - he had his penus out of his trousers. Unbelievable -- women harassed in a mosque by the guy working there.
Physical aggression - this is the worst thing that happened to us
We just arrived in Kashan, and wanted to visit some historical houses. It was a Friday, Iran's day off, and nobody was around. A guy with a moped started following us: at every crossroads he was there, staring at us. We turned into a narrower street directed to the house. The guy with the moped accelerated and overtook us, then he turned somewhere. We couldn't find the house and started to feel uncomfortable, so decided to go back to the big street. Suddenly he appeared at our backs and while accelerating with his moped he grabbed one of our butts. He then stopped in front of us, blocking our exit to the main road, and started masturbating himself. The one who had been touched was frozen to the spot in horror, the other one started cursing in Italian advancing toward him, but still he didn't stop. So tried a more international: "help! help! help!". At this point he left. 

Because of these episodes, we didn't feel safe for all our journey. Nevertheless we decided not to go to the police, because we didn't want to have a possible new problem to deal with. But what we did was to tell all Iranians who asked us about our impressions of the country what happened to us. And we were very disappointed by the reaction of most of the people: "But it happens also in Rome or Naples, right?". "No!" we stiffly answered. Finally, in a city that had very narrow roads that meant possible dangers for us, we decided to visit with a tour guide, and we explicitly asked for a woman. While visiting, we started telling her what happened to us and asking her if we were doing something wrong, or maybe it had something to do with us being foreigners. At first she tried not to answer and changed the subject. But as we insisted, she did answer. And we had our hearts full of pain. She told us that when she was in high school someone tried to rape her. It was early in the morning, and an old man who had a shop in those narrow roads trapped her. He took his pants off, but luckily a man arrived and saved her. Her dad couldn't do anything other than sell their house and buy a new one in a neighborhood where streets were wider. She said it's normal for a woman to be touched or followed by men, and maybe it happened many times to us because one of us looked like an Iranian. And there is not much she can do, except for having a pepper spray in her bag, avoiding narrow streets and staying at home when nobody is around, even if it's during the day. She also had many problems while with tourists. Once, she was with an all women group sitting in front of a historical site. Suddenly a group of young men with mopeds started to drive in circles around them, then threw the guide on the floor and the worst thing would have happened if a man hadn't appeared attracted by all that noise. And she told us that also little kids are not immune from harassment. We were shocked, but finally found someone who didn't try to avoid or minimize facts, but instead shared with us harsh and intimate suffering. And were surprised when two male Chinese tourists told us that they too had been touched on their butts - by men. Too bad for former President Ahmadinejad, who said that homosexuality doesn't exist in Iran. 

Much has to be done in Iran. And not only because the Islamic Republic wants to skyrocket its 3 million tourists par year to 20 million in ten years. But first and for most for Iranian women. Those living in big cities like Tehran or Shiraz stretch the Islamic rules by pushing their veil as far back as possible, covering their faces with a ton of makeup and kitsch plastic surgery (Iran has seven times more plastic surgery operations than the US) and hang around with men even if they're not their relative or husband. But most of those in villages still have to live a backward and constrained life. As soon as we arrived in accommodation in a local house near the desert, we were surprised to hear from the owner the following sentence: "If you are a lesbian couple don't worry, I couldn't care less, you can push the beds together". It's not the kind of thing you would expect to hear in a country where homosexuals can be condemned to death penalty! And he also added that we could take off our veils in the house. Well, we thought, even if in the middle of nowhere, they've been living with tourists from all over the world for many years, so they must have become openminded - yeah, until we had dinner with them. We were wondering why their fourteen year old daughter wasn't eating with us. She can't be hungry, we thought. Instead, while we were cleaning up, we saw her in the kitchen, eating by herself behind the door, with her veil on. There were two male tourists with us, so she had to eat in a separate room. In their parents' mind they were probably preserving her for a future marriage, in a country where men and women cannot even lightly touch. But to us it looked like segregation.


It was very liberating to take off our veils as soon as we put a foot on the plane that would have taken us home. It's not just about covering your head, but it's that constant feeling of valuing something less and being vulnerable to savage instincts that is suffocating. And first and foremost, the awareness that for you it was just a two weeks holiday, but for millions of women it's their existence. We'll never forget a young woman we met. She was sitting in front of a mosque in Kashan dressed in a chador that didn't cover her smiley face, studying for her driving license exam. She was waiting for some tourists to talk to. She was eighteen years old and with her fluent English she started asking us many direct questions, from what we thought about Islam to our acceptance of wearing the veil. She was really into geopolitics too. "What would you like to study at university?", we asked her. "Political science. But my parents won't let me, so I'll have to study psychology". We took a selfie together and left. We then started wondering what such a brilliant and curious woman could be making of her life. If only she could have been free. If only she could have had the right to be herself. 
Giulia Innocenzi and Maddalena Oliva, two Italian journalists on holiday in Iran


Former American Embassy, now called Den of Espionage, with its self-explanatory murales.
Bazar in Tehran in an empty afternoon.
Women waiting for their women only subway cars -- very useful if you want to keep your butt safe.

Get into the women only subway cars and feel safe.

Wonderful Abo-o-Atash park in Northern Tehran. Enjoy watching Iranians having picnics and kids having fun playing with water.
Beautiful Golestan palace in Tehran.
Great restaurant in Northern Tehran: good food, wonderful music. Too bad they can't dance. 

We moved from city to city always by bus -- comfortable, efficient, VERY cheap.
Walking in Kashan.
Kashan's bazar - 1
Kashan's bazar - 2
Kashan's bazar - 3

Kashan's fascinating hammam.

Kashan's skyline.
In Kashan some renovation is needed.
Enjoying a great rice and rose water dessert in the amazing square of Esfahan.

Admiring Esfahan square.
Iran has the world guinness for nose plastic surgery -- and they're proud of it, so they show off their band-aid from a fresh surgery.

Esfahan wonderful bridges.
Wonderful Abbasi hotel in Esfahan, very popular also among locals.


And when you go to Abbasi hotel, don't forget to taste their noodle soup with beans -- great for vegetarians who look for a relief from kebab!
Taking pictures in Esfahan mosque.
Walking in the desert between Esfahan and Yazd.
Eating and sleeping like them -- on the floor.
Khomeini's face everywhere.
This bird looking at the swimming pool from its cage seemed to me the best pic representing Iran. 
Yazd.

Yazd poetic nights.
Cycling in Yazd.
Zoroastrian temple in Yazd with its eternal flame, said to have burned for more than 1500 years.
Yazd.
Persepolis.
Ecstatic in Persepolis.
Everything is under renovation in Iran, so they'll be ready for when tourists will discover this beautiful country.

Martyrs' faces of the war between Iran and Iraq are everywhere in the country.

Evocative tomb of Hafez, the poet in all Iranians' hearts, in Shiraz.

But never forget your selfie stick.
This taxi driver was very fond of his English car.

Bursting relief on the airplane back home: free from our headscarves! 



38 commenti:

Anonimo ha detto...

Ciao, abbiamo la stessa età.
Sono cresciuta in un paese del sud Italia. Ricordo con orrore le molestie dei miei compagni tra i banchi di scuola alle medie. Ma non solo. I commenti pesanti di uomini di ogni età che mi incrociavano per strada. Mani sul sedere? Succedeva più spesso di quanto tu possa pensare.
A 19 anni mi sono trasferita a Milano. Per la prima volta mi sono imbattuta in uomini (italiani) che per strada mostravano il pene alle donne che passavano. Una volta un ragazzo ha iniziato a masturbarsi sulla panchina di fronte a quella su cui ero seduta con due amiche, in pieno centro di giorno.
Questa estate se non erro un paio di ragazze straniere sono state violentate da ragazzi italiani in Italia. Senza parlare di tutte quelle che vengono "solo" molestate.
Grazie per il tuo racconto, l'Iran deve essere un bellissimo Paese. Bello come l'Italia...

Anonimo ha detto...

Ciao Giulia,
belle foto! Innanzitutto mi trovo daccordo con il precedente commento, queste cose succedono anche in Italia da nord a sud. Poi aggiungo che il mio compagno é Iraniano (conviviamo da 7 anni ormai). Piú precisamente viene da Isfahan. La sua famiglia, come molte altre nella loro cerchia di amicizie, é estremamente moderna e non applica nessuna delle leggi dettate dall'Islam eccetto per quelle che vanno seguite nei luoghi pubblici per ovvi motivi. Mia suocera é sempre stata una persona indipendente e di grande cultura, ha fatto sempre tutto da sola e non ha mai avuto nessuna delle esperienze di cui parli. Il mio compagno ha anche una sorella, ora 30enne single con due lauree, ed ha frequentato scuole, universitá e quant'altro a Isfahan senza mai avere problermi. Certo, se uno si va a infilare in un vicolo buio e mail frequentato puó capitare il peggio, ma credimi questo succede anche a NewYork, Parigi, Milano e Napoli. Ovviamente in Iran molte persone sono represse da tutti I punti di vista e certi comportamenti possono anche scaturire da questo, ma io non credo che sia un paese di pervertiti come pare di leggere tra le righe del tuo blog. Ovviamente é un paese pieno di contraddizioni e di estremismi ridicoli ma ricordiamoci che é anche un paese pieno di persone che vorrebbero vivere in un mondo libero e lottano tutti I giorni per questo. Certo nelle grandi cittá si respire un'aria piú vivace e moderna mentre se si va nei paesi ai margini del nulla ci si imbatte in credenze medievali.....ma prova ad andare in un paesino dell'aspromonte e trova le differenze.

In ogni caso con questo mio messaggio voglio solo dire che per essere turisti del mondo bisogna anche saper interpretare quello che ci accade intorno senza pregiudizi.

SybelleDyb ha detto...

In Italia accadono le stesse cose? Personalmente, non mi è mai capitato. Sono nata nella provincia di Sondrio e da 8 anni, ormai, vivo a Milano.
Quando giro per strada mi sento in difficoltà/imbarazzo solo quando passo davanti ai non italiani, che non troppo velatamente fanno apprezzamenti/guardano/ridono/mormorano.

Non mi reputo razzista ma credo che il particolare momento storico che stiamo vivendo non ci renda pienamente obiettivi, e mi ci metto per prima. Purtroppo la mia esperienza nei paesi musulmani si limita alla Turchia e al Marocco. Paesi turistici, certo, in cui però i passanti mi si avvicinavano chiedendomi di andare a casa con loro, se volessi far sesso con loro. Sguardi insistenti, pedinamenti, commenti e ammiccamenti sono all'ordine del giorno. Quindi scusate se dico che no, l'Italia non è così. Gli italiani non sono così o, per lo meno, questa non è la normalità.

Anonimo ha detto...

Qui nessuno ha detto che l'Italia é cosí o gli italiani sono cosí. E' stato solo detto che queste cose succesono o possono succedere in ogni porto affollato (metropolis) inclusa l'Italia. E poi la critica é sul pregiudizio.

Anonimo ha detto...

ma smettila con ste lagne

anna tecchiati ha detto...

Purtroppo in quanto donne tutte abbiamo subito molestie, la differenza secondo me sta nel fatto che voi le avete subite "concentrate" in due sole settimane di vacanze ed è certamente dovuto al fatto che eravate due donne sole in viaggio in un paese islamico. Io da ragazza ho viaggiato con due amiche in lungo ed in largo in Scandinavia per un mese senza subire alcuna molestia. Chi nega questo fatto è in malafede (ed è uomo). Saluti

Riccardo ha detto...

Ciao,

a parte i commenti di Iraniani che difendono il proprio paese o di altri che vorrebbero paragonare l'Italia all'Iran bisogna dire le cose come stanno e trovo molto coraggioso aver scritto sul Blog che la cosa che più ha colpito non è stata la " palpatina al suk " ma il fatto che episodi del genere succedessero costantemente e che colpiscono in particolare donne e bambini iraniani e non sono un trattamento riservato agli stranieri.

Per esperienza ( ho viaggiato in molti paesi mediorientali e non, mussulmani e non )posso dire che queste cose purtroppo succedono perchè in molte culture la donna viene considerata debole e subordinata all'uomo.
Il fatto che si tenda a minimizzare o a generalizzare ( queste cose succedono anche in Italia.....Balle da noi se succedono sono episodi non la regola, da noi se denunci succede qualcosa non si rischia di essere vittime una seconda volta ) non fa altro che peggiorare le cose e rallenta il processo di sviluppo di certe culture.
Conosco molti iraniani, in medio oriente sono tra le popolazioni più colte ed evolute e se non avessero un regime teocratico opprimente potrebbero eccellere come paese e come persone e potrebbero veramente avere un forte sviluppo turistico.
Grazie per il bel articolo

Anonimo ha detto...

A chi dice che succede anche in Italia... se leggete bene il post dell'autrice, notate che le palpate erano QUOTIDIANE.
Sono maschio, ma ho parenti ed amiche femmine, nonche' partner. Per quanto non possiamo generalizzare basandoci sulla nostra esperienza individuale, (ne la mia, ne la vostra, ne quella dell'autrice) in Italia, almeno a Milano, la palpata capita, ma NON e' quotidiana.

Anonimo ha detto...

Penso che, come al solito, se si parla di peni volanti e palpate di culo, ovviamente l'articolo lo leggono tutti...
Altrimenti cara Giulia, il tuo articolo l'avresti letto solo tu!
Devo dire che sono un po' delusa. Mi sembravi una giornalista diversa.
Comunque riprova... Forse alla prossima sarai piu' fortunata.

Anonimo ha detto...

Non posso che condividere la lettera di Giulia Presbitero per l'analisi pacata ed equilibrata che fa della situazione del paese e della presunta disavventura. La inadeguatezza culturale della pseudo-giornalista Innocenzi è solo confrrmata dalla lettura di questo articolo, ne abbiamo contezza e certezza dalla visone delle trasmissioni tv da Lei condotte. Torni a studiare, cosa che certamente non ha fatto al tempo dell'università!

Anonimo ha detto...

Post per certi versi interessante, il titolo però è semplicemente ridicolo: "...quello che gli uomini non dicono"??!!!

Anonimo ha detto...

non voglio entrare nel merito dell´articolo perché mi sembra molto superficiale di per se, mi trovo abbastanza d´accordo con i primi due commenti e quindi non aggiungo altro se non che ho diverse amiche (anche hostess) che sono spesso in Iran e non mi hanno mai raccontato di questi problemi...poi buh saró un uomo ma la lettura di Persopolis mi aveva dato un´altra idea.

In ogni caso non capisco che c´entra il commento di Anna Tecchiati "Chi nega questo fatto è in malafede (ed è uomo)"...ma che significa?
Guarda, io sto in Danimarca e giusto in questi giorni c´é un dibattito acceso perché sono uscite statistiche sulle violenze sessuali che dicono che delle 3600 annue ne vengono denunciate solo 395 e solo in 60 casi ci sono delle condanne! a volte é addirittura la polizia a sconsigliare la denuncia...Guardando poi alla Svezia una mia amica che lavorava in polizia mi ha detto che le molestie erano il crimine numero uno e non a caso la Svezia ha leggi severissime in materia (a contrario della Danimarca...basta ricordare anche il caso Assange). Finlandia? beh i furbacchioni aspettano solo che si ubriachino...non é forse violenza anche questa?
In ogni caso chiedere ad una ragazza se si vuole andare a letto anche solo dopo mezz´ora che si conosce (se non te lo chiede lei) in questi paesi é socialmente accettato, frutto di una liberazione sessuale e dei costumi (che a torto viene scambiato per puttanesimo dalle italiane perbeniste) che in Italia raggiungeremo quando si manderá di nuovo il papa ad Avignone...ma questa é un´altra storia

Forse saró uomo peró almeno sono informato.

Diana ha detto...

Sono stata in Iran l'anno scorso e ho fatto praticamente lo stesso giro delle due autrici, senza guida e senza gruppo di supporto e non ho riscontrato MAI nessun episodio anche solo lontanamente simile a quelli descritti.
Anzi, ho trovato l'Iran un paese stupendo che cerca disperatamente di uscire dall'isolamento a cui l'hanno costretto tutti questi anni di guida miope ed integralista.
Abbiamo conosciuto ogni giorno tantissime persone che ci fermavano per poter chiacchierare, che ci offrivano un the, un gelato, una bibita o addirittura il pranzo in uno dei mille parchi di Isfahan.
Abbiamo parlato con donne, ragazze, studentesse, uomini, giovani e anziani, tutti gentilissimi, curiosi nei nostri confronti, tutti che speravano che la loro nazione ci piacesse e che stessimo avendo una bella esperienza. Era quasi impossibile camminare per strada senza interagire con qualcuno, ma sempre con molto garbo ed educazione.
Siamo stati invitati ad un matrimonio, a pranzo, abbiamo chiacchierato con mille persone anche quando le parole in comune erano meno di 10. Addirittura spesso siamo entrati in moschee o mausolei che la guida definiva "proibiti" ai non mussulmani perchè c'era sempre qualcuno disposto ad aiutarci e desideroso di condividere con noi ciò che in essa era conservato.
Ero con il mio compagno, non siamo sposati eppure nessuno ha mai fatto commenti poco opportuni o volgari, anzi!
In più spesso ho anche girato da sola e non mi è mai successo nulla se non incontrare persone che mi avvicinavano chiedendomi di dove fossi e qualche informazione generica sull'Italia. La parte più bella è stata l'aver portato molte cartoline di Roma da mostrare loro e da scambiare quando volevamo lasciare un ricordo e un indirizzo mail per mantenere i contatti.
Per tutti questi motivi mi ha molto intristito questo post che sembra scritto più per far notizia/scandalo piuttosto che per dare un'esatta raffigurazione di un paese tanto splendido.

Shab Yalda ha detto...

Mi spiace per la vostra esperienza, spero che non influenzi troppo negativamente il vostro giudizio e che l'immagine che ne risulta non trattenga altre donne dal viaggiare sole. Certe cose a me non sono successe in Iran dove ho vissuto per molti anni e dove ho viaggiato sia sola, che con mio figlio piccolo, con amiche o con parenti donne. Certo evitavo di ritrovarmi in situazioni disagevoli, ma questo lo faccio anche in Italia (tra l'altro una palpata me la son presa di recente in bus a Venezia :D ) Ragazzi e uomini repressi li troviamo anche in altri posti, in una situazione come l'Iran non è strana, da lì a generalizzare ne corre. Generalmente in Iran ho trovato grande rispetto, tra la gente comune, per le donne e molta gentilezza.

Anonimo ha detto...

La scandinavia è un caso a parte. Io ci vivo da 10 anni e sono una donna.....qui per sperare che un uomo tenti un approccio o deve essere completamente ubriaco o devi usare siti di incontri.

w l'Iran ha detto...

care ragazze, a leggere il vostro articolo mi è venuta una sorta di straniamento: state raccontando cose realmente accadute o siete un tantino esagerate? tutti 'sti peni esibiti, tutti che si masturbano alla vostra vista ... ma non starete esagerando? sono stata due volte in Iran anche con amiche più avvenenti di me e NON E' MAI SUCCESSO NULLA, mai, neanche un accenno di molestia, persino in luoghi come le palestre in cui si praticano antiche discipline riservate agli uomini....
boh....sono veramente perplessa: sarete mica mitomani?

Anonimo ha detto...

La prossima volta vai a Capalbio

Marco ha detto...

I'm wondering what a penus is..

Concordo con le perplessità: una lettura di spiacevoli episodi per me discutibile e di una superficialità imbarazzante.

Mah..resto perplesso, avendo viaggiato nel paese e frequentando ragazzi e ragazze iraniane, non riesco davvero a ritrovarmi nel vostro punto di vista, al di là di tutto.

Marco

Ari Elopola ha detto...

Come fa certa gente a dire che quando sono state in Iran questo non è accaduto e negare la gravità del problema?? E' una concezione schifosa quello di considerare un problema solo quello che si vive sulla propria pelle. Io non sono stata mai in Zimbawe e non ho mai provato cosa significa morire di fame, questo però non mi permette di dire che la fame in Africa non esista.
Quel che è accaduto è terribile e si meritava di essere denunciato perchè questo è quello che si dovrebbe fare con una molestia.
Purtroppo a me capita l'80% delle volte che esco di casa da sola di essere molestata, vivo a Roma e capisco che sensazione si prova ad essere "violentate" con gli occhi, capisco cosa si prova a non sentirsi al sicuro anche se le mie esperienze, ringraziando Dio, non sono niente in confronto alle molestie che avete provato voi.
Grazie a questo post avete messo in risalto un problema che molte volte non viene segnalato, che viene classificato come una di quelle cose che capitano almeno una volta nella vita e che ormai, ai tempi di oggi, bisogna farci l'abitudine.
Io personalmente non mi abituerò mai a quelle frasi schifose che apparentemente sembrano innocue ma che nascondono un messaggio perverso, non mi abituerò mai di quegli sguardi che tentano di spogliarti, che ti scrutano senza aver paura di essere notati, che ti fissano insistentemente e non si staccano, come una zecca attaccata alla sua preda. Dopo aver detto questo concludo ringraziandovi ancora per aver condiviso questo articolo, mi dispiace se vi toccherà leggere dei commenti orribili, ma d'altronde alcune di quelle persone credono ancora che questo mondo sia perfetto...

Sepehr ha detto...

I am an Iranian living in Italy since 2 years ago. I am writing this in English but I'll ask my friend to rewrite in in proper Italian language as well. I did not know who you are, let alone I knew your weblog. I read your article because one of my friends who is Italian and spent about 21 days last summer in Iran sent me a text on Whatsapp saying that "I would like to discuss with you this bullshit" and then the link for your article saying that "she's a quite famous Italian journalist who traveled in Iran last month".
At first I should say that I am really frustrated that ones like you call themselves journalists!!!, since the only thing that I could get impressed by your article is that the author has tried by the best to mislead the readers about the realities of a country and a nation with a great and old historical culture, where Hegel names the Persians as the first Historical People, though I have no idea that how and by whom or because of what reason you have inspired to write this libelous fiction story. Having said that I just would like to mention some points.
1-In every country you can find formal statistics about raping, harassment, etc, and especially a western countries, if you were a real journalist you would already now that, as you can read lots of news ( that are just those that are being officially announced) in Italian medias as well.
2-Being in the wrong place is dangerous, does not matter which country.
3-I can not understand why you did not want to go to police ??!!! (so funny). and I should mention that internal security by police force in Iran is well-known, unless you are in the middle of no where that the only creatures are snakes and criminals, and especially tourists are really protected in normal places in Iran by police ( both because of personal security and also internal security issues) and I can say my Italian friend experienced that, he may say that in the translation comment.
3- The famous mosque of Isfahan is one of the most famous, touristic and crowded places in Isfahan, how can one believes that one of it's workers shows his penis (or as you said PENUS) to you in the middle of the day and in front of that crowd!!! LOL
4-I can not believe that everyday in everywhere and by everyone you were asked to have sex with them.
5-And as I don't want to waist my time more to criticize your silly childish article, I wonder why didn't you even have a nice experience to say about that when lots of tourists are being excited by seeing lots of places in Iran.

Anonimo ha detto...

This woman is demented and her demented article needs to be reported to the Iranian Embassy in Rome. I have lived in Iran two years and NEVER NEVER I have been harrassed when I was out on my own. Stupid stupid woman
Anna

Ricky ha detto...

Esprimo tutta la mia solidarietà a Giulia Innocenzi. Si può dire che questo post è superficiale, ma in nessun caso si possono giustificare gli attacchi che ha ricevuto e le accuse di essere bugiarda. Accuse ridicole, perchè trattandosi del racconto della SUA esperienza, la stessa accusa di aver raccontato falsità potrebbe benissimo essere mossa a chi racconta di un'esperienza senza problemi dal punto di vista delle molestie sessuali.

Evidentemente il 99% dei commentatori/commentatrici che l'accusano non hanno mai letto Shirin Ebadi, Marjan Satrapi o Azar Nafisi (a meno che non pensino che anche loro mentono o sono pagate dai sionisti per screditare l'Iran), né viene loro neppure per un momento in mente che se in una metropolitana vengono istituiti vagoni per sole donne evidentemente un problema c'è e non si può ignorare (e neppure è dovuto alla religione mussulmana, dato che vagoni riservati alle donne esistono pure a Mexico DF).

Infine, alla tal Giulia Presbitero vorrei dire che la sua lunga lettera e le sue dotte argomentazioni scompaiono di fronte all'accusa che muove alla Innocenzi di aver provocato le molestie che ha subito a causa di un comportamento non consono. Lei si dovrebbe solo vergognare di quello che ha scritto.

Anonimo ha detto...

We had been in Iran with a group of german students. At least 3 of us experienced equal harrasments. Iranian friends of mine were shocked, that they took the group to the bazar at all, cause butt grapping is very well known to happen there. They told me, their friends who need to go there often, take needles with them, to hit them into the butt grabbers hands at the time they are touched.

Of course equal cases can be reported from any other region of the world, but with a law counting the female voice half only it's not common to go to the police with this problem especially they make you feel guilty by telling you not beeing dressed properly. (That's what's happening in the German society too. When you got harrassed, some ppl ask you first what you was wearing.)

We also had a 'masturbation harrasment' in Turkey while diving - and neither the ppl who it happened to (Turkish themselves) nor the host (Turkish too) went to the police since they know they only cover this. Also myself have been harresed by my boss here in Germany at work, as well as other females of my company - nobody went to police. You have nobody to cover your story very often. So I really don't get Sepehr's comment, that not going to the police would be funny.

Paolo ha detto...

Alcuni mesi fa un famoso comico americano, Bill Maher, liberal e di sinistra ebbe una violenta discussione in TV con un altro "intellettuale" liberal, l'attore e regista Ben Affleck. Tema del contendere era l'idea di Maher e di Sam Harris che la religione islamica fosse basata su disvalori e pessime idee, prima tra tutte la misoginia. Questa idea e' apparentemente inaccettabile per la sinistra piu' politicamente corretta e pronta a legittimare qualsiasi (ma davvero qualsiasi) idea provenga da una cultura straniera, in nome del relativismo culturale e per non apparire razzista.
Per questo non mi stupiscono i commenti a questo post. Chi commenta sa benissimo che la situazione della donna a Milano o Napoli non e' la stessa che a Tehran, ma fa finta di ignorarlo. La liberta' che le due amiche hanno respirato in Turchia deriva dal secolarismo imposto con la forza da Ataturk e che Erdogan sta pian piano smantellando: secondo me tra pochi anni si vedranno poche donne senza velo anche li'.
Non e' solo un problema dell'Islam, la situazione nei secoli scorsi in Europa e fino a pochi decenni fa in Italia non era molto migliore: anche la religione cristiana non incoraggia la liberta' delle donne. Ma negare che questo sia oggi un problema dell'Islam e' ridicolo.

piernulla ha detto...

Salve mi chiamo Pierluigi Scabini e vorrei dire alcune cose su questa avventura.
Uno: le molestie sessuali perpetrate da uomini verso donne, sono un offesa alle donne, sono un esempio di maschilismo, nel senso di esaltazione dell'essere maschi, una sorta di identificazione nel pene e nella sessualità e nella mancanza totale di rispetto dell'altro sesso. QUINDI SONO FELICE CHE LE DONNE COMBATTANO PER LA LORO LIBERTA D'ESPRESSIONE OVUNQUE NEL MONDO. SEMPLICEMENTE PERCHE AMO LA LIBERTA MIA E DI TUTTI.

Due: cio che ho detto sopra non vuol dire che io sia femminista. Non sono ne maschilista, ne femminista e non amo il maschilismo come esaltazione del maschio e non amo il femminismo come esaltazione della femmina. L'islam, a mio avviso, ha vissuto di cultura infarcita di religione, di usanze e riti, e le persone che sono rimaste in quello e solo in quello, sono purtroppo arenate nella loro evoluzione di coscienza. Io non esalto nessuna religione, non mi identifico in nessuna religione e ritengo che esse siano responsabili dell'ottundimento della coscienza umana per secoli e secoli. E l'islam, anche quello moderato, non rappresenta altro che identificazione in un Dio esterno all'uomano dove l'umano non deve altro che seguire riti e rituali e incarnare regole di coscienza strette come la cruna di un ago. Questo è abbattimento del pensiero illimitato, della coscienza libera, della realizzazione di Dio come infinità in tutto e in tutto. Ed è anche responsabilità di una cultura repressiva sulla sessualità che è distruzione dell'essere umano.

Tre: Io non ritengo di essere un identità sessuale, al 90% sono un identità spirituale. E' da 45 anni che sono in questo mondo e ho compiuto il mio cammino spirituale e di evoluzione di coscienza da quando sono nato. Al 10% sono un identità maschile, e ho imparato a usare le mie energie sessuali come evoluzione di coscienza. Ma per questo ci vuole amore per se stessi e per la libertà di tutti, uomini e donne, considerando tutti con grande rispetto e dignità.

Quattro: la cultura islamica è pervasa da cultura maschilista. La cultura occidentale il maschilismo è presente, ma meno rispetto la cultura islamica. E comunque ricordo a tutte le donne e a tutti gli uomini che esitono anche molti uomini che non sono affatto maschilisti e non sono affatto identificati nella loro identità sessuale. Qui un occidente abbiamo un maschilismo che ha paura della libertà delle donne e tale maschilismo è ancora piu presente nella cultura islamica. Abbiamo anche qui in occidente un femminismo che si identifica nella superiorità della femmina nel suo poter generare figli e nella sua intelligenza. Non condivido niente di tutto ciò, ne per quanto riguarda il maschilismo, ne per quanto riguarda il femminismo.

Cinque: Amo la Libertà e la Libertà di tutti e tutto. E chi ama la libertà non dovrebbe definirsi femminista o maschilista. Chi ama la libertà e combatte per essa, che sia contro uomini arroganti e maschilisti, che sia contro potentati vari che vogliono dominare l'umano, che sia lotta contro il potere che vuole dominare la volontà altrui, o altro dovrebbe vedere se stesso come Libertà del Vento e delle Stelle, niente di piu che Libertà espressa come individuo che prima di essere uomo o donna è semplicemente individuo (individuo non è ne maschile, ne femminile come parola per me) che ama la sua libertà e la libertà di tutto e tutti.

Mia Verità ciò che ho detto.
Ho visto alcune volte alcune trasmissioni tue Giulia, non sempre perchè non guardo molta Tv.
Un caro saluto e forza e coraggio, che la vostra esperienza vi dia ancora piu forza per affermare la LIBERTA IMPERITURA PER TUTTO E TUTTI.

Pierluigi Scabini

Marco ha detto...

Cara Giulia, a volte essere un personaggio pubblico comporta anche alcune responsabilità e tra queste certamente c'e' il peso che possono assumere i tuoi giudizi che definirei quanto meno superficiali. Ho viaggiato in Iran con un gruppo di amici, più donne che uomini, e questo esercito di maniaci non l'abbiamo incontrato. Invece abbiamo parlato con tanti giovani che ci tenevano a farci conoscere la loro voglia di normalità e la loro insofferenza verso l'oppressione del potere clericale. Per aiutarli occorre abbattere il muro di diffidenza che ci separa e al quale il tuo scritto ha aggiunto altri mattoni. Come piccolo contributo, e per ringraziare gli amici iraniani dei tanti sorrisi che ci hanno regalato durante il viaggio, vi segnalo la photostory realizzata in Persia all'indirizzo http://www.markos.it/iran
Il fornaio di Shushtar, ritratto in una delle immagini, il suo pane appena sfornato ce l'ha offerto e non ha voluto essere pagato.

Alireza Abiz ha detto...

As an Iranian, I don't accuse these ladies of lying. I am sure that their story is partly true but I think they might have exaggerated. In general, Iranians are very hospitable and extremely respect tourists (much more than they sometimes deserve), but there are some areas and neighbourhoods where this type of harassment might happen, not only to the tourists but even more to the locals. My advice is to travel freely in Iran but get a little information about the rough areas (as in any other country). If you travel with a tour guide, you will enjoy good company. I remember I travelled to some remote areas with a European friend of mine and in the middle of the night, we were visited by the police. They told me that they came to check and see if everything is OK with our 'guest'! So, going to the police is not a bad idea. I'm sorry for their bad experience, but this shouldn't deter others! There are thousands of good stories as well! Best of luck to anybody who wants to visit!

messaggere ha detto...

Che internet sia nato "per noi" è una espressione papesca: è nato e basta e, talvolta purtroppo, è aperto a tutti. Ciò detto, una donna che subisce molestie e poi le denuncia non andrebbe insultata, chiunque essa sia, ma incoraggiata, nel senso di darle sostegno a superare il trauma ed a perseguire l'obbiettivo della sua denuncia. Queste molestie sono state subite in un territorio che è parte di una area geografica dove tradizionalmente (e per religione) la donna è povera cosa. In molti Paesi del Mondo è così: si pensi all'India, con la sua estensione magna; il fatto dunque che gli episodi siano accaduti in una di queste aree dispiace, per la vittima, ma non sconcerta: potevano accadere più facilmente lì che non altrove. Non era possibile prendere provvedimenti perché non accadessero (scorta di uomini, avvertimenti preventivi alla polizia del luogo, evitamento di luoghi appartati o frequentati dai soli locali)? Certo che un viaggio con limitazioni del genere, per chi vuole conoscere davvero un Paese, è deludente, ma d'altronde si sa che il Medio Oriente ha quella idea della donna. La sua denuncia risulta perciò - pur suscitando lo sdegno che sempre questi racconti meritano - un po' ridondante. E visto come va quel territorio, non possiamo supporre vi saranno cambiamenti prima di alcune generazioni. Un saluto.

Elaheh Zahedi ha detto...

Hi,
First of all I am sorry for your bad experience that you had in my country, but it is not good to write an article which is too offensive about Iran and iranians who as you said were so happy to have you in their country also I am sure you had fun too.
I had a trip to Italy just a month ago I had alot of problems from the very beginning at Fiumicino Airport. They didn't wlcome me! They didn't say welcome to Italy they didn't let me to go to the territory of schengen but they did ask me where I was from not just at the airport aslo in the street.
I was supposed to go to Calabria from Rome and I met a guy in the airplain who was from Vibo Valentzio. He helped me alot but in this way: as soon as we got to Roma Termini he took me to san lorenzo neighborhood to buy weed which was full of drug addicted sellers that were surrounding us! In Iran there is no place like this so popular to buy drugs. There were no police and the place was not safe. Isn't it scary enough to hate Rome and write an article about this bad experience? I was too tired to walk let alone with my baggage to just buy drugs which it was not even ligal. We couldn't find a ticket to Amantea (Calabria) so we had to waste time around Roma Termini it was not pleasant at all an addicted girl attacked me to get a cigarette they were staying and making fun of me I couldn't even run because it made the situation worse. it was at middnight that we found a ticket but it was not direct so we had to change alot of trains and the gap between trains was at least one hour I was on the way for 12 hours.the guy who wanted to help we was slept all the trip even in the stations. I was all alone. The worst part was in Caserta Station when a guy was pretending to help and guide me. He insisted on me to follow him to the dark but I ran to the office and stayed there. I even record a video of myself and explained the whole the situation for the emergency. Long story short...I had problems too I was a young girl and a foreigner in the town I didn't expect a heaven I adjusted the situation with the people I respect their opinions I wanted to live like them for 8 days not change their life because I am from a different culture.
I have seen the same picture of The Pop everywhere but I respected it is no big deal! People have different opinions and religions! I Live in Iran in Tehran I have been to Bazzar several times alone. I have never had those problems. As your picture shows you were there in the afternoon ! No one goes there at that time because most shops are closed!
I have seen alot of homeless , dirty , rude, and addicted people in Italy but it didn't change my mind or I didn't let myself to judg a country and the whole people by them.
I think you should have done your homework before going to a foreign country and have more information about everything.
with all of those problems which has turned to good memories I love Italy and Italians, and they are so welcome to my country.

Elaheh Zahedi ha detto...

Hi,
First of all I am sorry for your bad experience that you had in my country, but it is not good to write an article which is too offensive about Iran and iranians who as you said were so happy to have you in their country also I am sure you had fun too.
I had a trip to Italy just a month ago I had alot of problems from the very beginning at Fiumicino Airport. They didn't wlcome me! They didn't say welcome to Italy they didn't let me to go to the territory of schengen but they did ask me where I was from not just at the airport aslo in the street.
I was supposed to go to Calabria from Rome and I met a guy in the airplain who was from Vibo Valentzio. He helped me alot but in this way: as soon as we got to Roma Termini he took me to san lorenzo neighborhood to buy weed which was full of drug addicted sellers that were surrounding us! In Iran there is no place like this so popular to buy drugs. There were no police and the place was not safe. Isn't it scary enough to hate Rome and write an article about this bad experience? I was too tired to walk let alone with my baggage to just buy drugs which it was not even ligal. We couldn't find a ticket to Amantea (Calabria) so we had to waste time around Roma Termini it was not pleasant at all an addicted girl attacked me to get a cigarette they were staying and making fun of me I couldn't even run because it made the situation worse. it was at middnight that we found a ticket but it was not direct so we had to change alot of trains and the gap between trains was at least one hour I was on the way for 12 hours.the guy who wanted to help we was slept all the trip even in the stations. I was all alone. The worst part was in Caserta Station when a guy was pretending to help and guide me. He insisted on me to follow him to the dark but I ran to the office and stayed there. I even record a video of myself and explained the whole the situation for the emergency. Long story short...I had problems too I was a young girl and a foreigner in the town I didn't expect a heaven I adjusted the situation with the people I respect their opinions I wanted to live like them for 8 days not change their life because I am from a different culture.
I have seen the same picture of The Pop everywhere but I respected it is no big deal! People have different opinions and religions! I Live in Iran in Tehran I have been to Bazzar several times alone. I have never had those problems. As your picture shows you were there in the afternoon ! No one goes there at that time because most shops are closed!
I have seen alot of homeless , dirty , rude, and addicted people in Italy but it didn't change my mind or I didn't let myself to judg a country and the whole people by them.
I think you should have done your homework before going to a foreign country and have more information about everything.
with all of those problems which has turned to good memories I love Italy and Italians, and they are so welcome to my country.

Shohre ha detto...

hi Giulia, I am so sorry about what has happened to you in Iran.
I am an Iranian girl and I know all too well what you have gone through.
I would never recommend solo foreigner girls to go to Iran. Always with men or with another Iranian girl. We know better how to deal with stupid situations like this.
The good thing is we are fighting back.
There will be a victory sooner or later.
Ciao!

Giulia Innocenzi ha detto...

Thank you very much Shohre, se're on Your side in this battle!

Anonimo ha detto...

Guilia
I am an Iranian woman and had experienced sexual harrassment when I was living there! But to be honest I can not believe the frequency of the harrassment you mentioned in your article esp. In a short trip, and again esp. In Isfahan Mosque which always has lots of visitors. Seems you were always in the wrong place in the wrong time, and had no idea about asking for help from people or police! No ti credo!

I remember when visiting Rome in 2004, I took a picture, I think near colosseum, and a fake Gladiator was in the background of my pic, I didn't mean him to be in my pic, then he asked for money and when I refused he kissed my chick abruptly! Shocking, I pushed him back and left. typical Italian man?!!! I don't judge Italians though I have heard some not-good stories from friends, dad and ...!

Anyway, you were unfair, exaggerated if I don't want say a liar and your article was offensive!

Anonimo ha detto...

As an Iranian who has lived in Europe for more than eleven years, each time I go back to my home country I am amazed by the progressive transformations occurring there, making me admire the courageous and creative people of Iran who despite difficult circumstances fight for change. In a continuous everyday struggle especially within the past few years, Iranians have gradually gone beyond the tolerated boundaries. They are not just fighting for what they ‘assume’ as their rights but they continuously define ‘new’ rights which are then achieved in a very creative manner. At the same time, encountering many male or female travelers to Iran they have always told me about being amazed by the hospitality, kindness, openness, and the positive energy of Iranian people (men and women) who had helped them during their stay in Iran and who had opened their houses to them.
However, as a female who has traveled to many countries of the world, I have always experienced harassment and inequality, be it in Germany, Italy, France, UK or Argentina, Brazil, Turkey, India or Iran, making me believe that violence and injustice against women are one of the darkest realities of our today’s world. Many of us have perhaps seen the video of the woman walking in the streets of New York City being harassed by men more than 100 times in her ten hour walk.
I truly believe that such analysis and judgments about Iran, which we read in this piece, only arises from a very shallow and Euro-centric understanding of society and politics. It arises from intolerance and ignorance. Unfortunately journalism is always subjective. However, the job is left to the conscious and intelligent reader to admire one piece and ignore the other.

Anonimo ha detto...

Hello! First of all, It is called "penis", not "penus"! Secondly, part of your article may be reality, but most of them are big lies that reflects racism, and prejudice. Finally, please improve your English!

Lucia Petrera ha detto...

Cara Giulia,
Ho sempre avuto una grande stima di te, e credo che la tua prefessionalità siano davvero ammirevoli. Prima di tutto perchè nonostante la tua giovane età hai sempre avuto un coraggio e una determinazione da cui tutti dovremmo prendere esempio. Secondo perchè considerato il quantitativo di attacchi verbali che ricevi ogni giorno, la tua pazienza é davvero notevole!
Comunque ti seguo molto sul facebook e sinceramente sono rimasta un po' stranita leggendo il post sil viaggio in Iran. Perchè mi è sembrato surreale. Ma non essendoci mai stata, non sono nella posizione di dire cosa sia vero o no. Però ho chiesto ad una mia collega iraniana che adesso vive qui in UK. Credo sia giusto che tu legga la sua risposta:
"hahaha! Ok I didnt finish the whole thing but basically she is saying that all Iranians are butt grabing stokers who love to show you their penuses! Seriously?!!!! Even from the picture that they have chosen for this article you can tell that it is going to be pretty biased. I have been to the bazar, I have been to Kashan, I went there actually in my previous visit to Iran and nothing like that happened to me ever! I have to say though of course men like to stare quite a lot and they like looking at pretty ladies while saying something to them every now and then which can be very annoying, and it has happened to me quite alot in Iran also about butt grabbing only once in the whole of 14 years when I was there but then again it happened to me twice here in a club. Also I know many people who have travled to Iran who say the absoloute opposite, I heard about this girl who cycled through Iran and was travelling through middle eastern countries by herself and actually she claimed Iran was the safest and the most welcoming out of all the other countries. The thing about Iran is that while they might misbehave towards their own women it is hardly unlikely that they would do the same towards foreigners, they would mostly behave ten times better than normal, again this is part of the whole culture and being an outstanding host. Important to all Iranians. I would say she was either paid to write this or was just very very unlucky. Although I can also imagine people showing alot of attention to them maybe even the butt grabbing might have happened, but not every where and all the time. Anyway im not surprised there are so many articles like this about Iran, its all part of a big porpaganda."
I would like to also add something to my previous comment; I am not ignoring the fact that sexual harrasment might be higher over there, and yes life is tougher for women, because of the islamic republic and the dress code forced on women and the fact that women try to fight this by wearing shorter more colourful and fashionable outfits which in turn causes alot of trouble sometimes, because it attracts attention, and women are often subjected to sexual comments and things like that, but having said that she is definitely EXAGARAGING quite alot, its as if I am reading a fictional story sometimes."

A concern citizen ha detto...

This article is full of lies. Why a person should go to such a extend is beyond me. Normal people can read between the lines and smell hatred, frustration, exaggeration and lies. There are elements of truth here and there but maximized to help an agenda. I am truly sorry for anyone to believe in this garbage story. The sheer volume of resentful events in two weeks is obviously a key factor to know this is not an honest story. Iranian police in uniform or under cover is literary everywhere and ordinary people can not do such actions in public even if they want to. Generalizing these people as restless perverted opportunists is very ugly and unfair for anyone who knows hospitable Iranian people. People should do their own research and find out instead of listening to this individual person.

Anonimo ha detto...

Hello! Sorry for the negative comments you are getting, questioning your experiences. I am an iranian woman living abroad for most of my life. I have heard what you describe from many iranian women and being in the west I know that the experiences are not comparable. It is not common here in the west to be grabbed as much for instance as it is in Iran (though sexism is of course a world wide problem). Iranian society is highly complex: Rampant sexism on one side, and a long tradition of strong women and even a feminist movement on the other. I for instance grew up in an extremely equalitarian family, where my dad cleaned and cooked as much as my mother, and we girls were told that we can achieve anything we set our minds to. I hope you will make better experiences in the future..